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Why you should get a carrer in Tourism & Travel – CATHSSETA

Tourism and Travel SETA , CATHSSETA

To get a overview of how important tourism is for South Africa, we’ve written this article. We also try to encourage the South African youths to apply for SETA bursaries.

The tourism and travel sub-sector makes a substantial contribution to the South African economy and in 2010 it directly contributed R67billion (3%) to the country’s Gross Domestic Product (GDP) creating 599 412 direct jobs. It covers 13 Standard Industrial Classification (SIC) codes consists of inbound and outbound tour operators, safaris and sightseeing bus tours and trip operators, inbound international flights, travel agencies, event and conference management, tourist information centre, car hire and tourism authorities as well as tourist guides including adventure, mountain and river guides.

Activities of these sectors are driven by a Chamber Committee established in terms of the CATHSSETA Constitution and is made up of key industry players such as government, labour organisations, NGO’s and employers.

The duties of the Chamber Committee are as follows:

  • Provide expert advice and strategic leadership,
  • Provide guidance regarding skills development,
  • Assist with the identification of strategic projects,
  • Assist with appropriate recognition of the sub-sector’s education and training needs

Careers in the Sector

The Tourism and Travel sector is extremely labour intensive and is a major source of employment, requiring various degrees of skill and provides women, youth and migrant employees with relatively easy access into the workforce. The industry is service oriented requiring professionals to know their product offerings to ensure service excellence.
A career in Tourism and Travel is demanding and requires people with good communication and listening skills, dedication to quality and good service, team player, good organisational skills, attention to detail and a preparedness to work under pressure. Competitiveness and productivity in the industry depend on skill levels, professionalism, commitment, passion, loyalty and soft skills of workers.

Source: www.cathsseta.org.za/

Work opportunities may be found in the airline industry, car rental, cruise ships, events management, government tourism departments, tourism information bureau and travel agencies.

These are some of the career options within the sector:

  • Public Sector – Government Tourism Official, Tourism Development Coordinator, Tourism Information Officer
  • Travel Agency – Retail Consultant and Travel Agents, Wholesale Travel-tour operator
  • Events and Convention Management Companies – Event Coordinator and Event Manager
  • Airline – Flight Attendants, Cabin Crew, Ground staff and airport personnel
  • Vehicle Rental – Car Hire Consultant and Sales Representatives

CATHSSETA Skills Development initiatives

CATHSSETA provides various skills development initiatives for both unemployed and employed in the tourism and travel sector.
The below links will provide you with a detailed list of available training opportunities and application period in the following:

  • Learnerships
  • Work integrated learning (Internships and experiential learning)
  • Skills Programmes
  • Bursaries

Hospitality and Tourism SETA Bursaries up for grabs

CATHSSETA 

Hospitality,
Tourism & Travel,
Gaming & Lotteries,
Conservation,
Sports Recreation & Fitness,
Arts Culture & Heritage

The Culture, Art, Tourism, Hospitality and Sports Seta (CATHSSETA) paid a visit to 25 of CPUT’s most promising Tourism and Hospitality Management students.

They were here to monitor and evaluate the students who are spread across various years of study and are the recipients of over R1 million in bursaries from the SETA.

The CATHSETA funds are being used to pay the students’ tuition fees, textbooks, accommodation, meals and other course related costs.

Fundraising Officer, Khumo Sebola, of CPUT’s Advancement Office, says the partnership between CPUT and the CATHSSETA has made a tangible difference to these student’s lives.

“These students now have the luxury of concentrating solely on their academic coursework, instead of stressing about textbook costs, or where their next meal will come from,” says Sebola.

“It is a sad reality that many of our most academically-deserving students are unable to complete their diplomas and degrees due to unbearable financial pressure. We’re therefore delighted to have hosted the CATHSETA on this evaluation visit, so they can see with their own eyes how beneficiaries are blossoming – all thanks to their generous funding.”

Advancement Director Calvin Maseko echoed these sentiments and expressed his gratitude to the CATHSSETA for their ongoing involvement with the CPUT.

“A bursary is definitely the gift that keeps on giving. These donations give dignity and hope to our talented students and contribute to skills development and socio-economic upliftment in our province and country.”

Source: www.cput.ac.za/

Students win top prizes

An innovative revamp of an existing solar cooking device has earned CPUT one of the top spots at this year International Xplore New Automation Competition.

A group of Electrical Engineering students scooped first place in the competition’s toughest category – Environment and Renewable Energy.

The team was one of 29 out of 100 selected to compete in the finals that took place in Germany earlier this month.

The team designed and built an automated solar oven power generator, a device that operates off-grid and which can be used to boil water, cook food and power a battery.

Maahir Rahmna, one of the five students in the team, says they are proud of their achievement.

“We won because we had an innovative idea,” he says.

The device is fully automated and features several new fittings, such as an engine that runs entirely on heat, a safety buzzer and several solar panels.

 

Helena Kennedy Foundation looking for students

Helena Kennedy Foundation Bursary Info

What they offer:

The HKF Award

An HKF award is about much more than money.  We know that the financial support provided to HKF award winners will be vital in enabling students who face financial difficulties to progress to higher education.  We also know that worries about money are only part of the story – our experience over the last decade has shown that offering students personal and practical support and opportunities throughout their time in higher education and beyond can improve a student’s chance of success and ultimately enhance employability.  The HKF award is a package of financial, personal and practical support and opportunities designed to support transition into higher education, enhance the student’s experience at university and improve chances of employment after graduation.

What you can expect from us:

  • Financial support, usually in the form of a £1500 bursary provided in instalments during your time in higher education.  Most students who make a successful application to the Foundation will receive a bursary but we also offer some scholarships, in partnership with individual universities, which may be offered instead of a bursary award.
  • A named contact at the Foundation, who can give advice, listen to problems, signpost to other organisations, celebrate your successes and be your point of contact for any questions and concerns.
  • Access to  free training sessions geared towards improving the skills you need throughout university and employment.  These range from confidence building to exam preparation or IT and we are always happy to take suggestions for new sessions.
  • Work Shadowing – we are aware of how difficult it can be to boost your CV when employers are always looking for something extra from potential employees. We can help organise work placements for students to help you gain experience and make contacts.
  • Opportunities to voulteer within the Foundation. Click here

What we expect from you:

Being an HKF award winner is a responsibility.  It is vital to the Foundation that we are able to keep in touch with our students, to find out how you are getting on and to gather regular feedback which helps us to monitor how the services we provide make a difference.  Each award winner is asked, as a condition of their award, to meet the following requirements.  If you can’t commit to fulfilling these conditions you shouldn’t apply for an award.

  • To keep the Foundation up to date with any changes in your contact details, email address or phone number.
  • To respond to requests for feedback from the Foundation within the time limit given.
  • To inform the Foundation if, for any reason, you change courses or universities, or have to leave your course either temporarily or permanently.
  • To update the Foundation, at least annually, on how you are getting on at university – this update can take whatever form you wish and doesn’t have to be long, we just need to know how you are doing.
  • To inform the Foundation, after graduation, of what class of degree you received and what you intend to do next.
  • To respond to requests for information from the Foundation as when you receive them.
  • To help us to publicise our work – this could be formally, for example, by giving permission for your story to be featured in our leaflets or on our website, or being interviewed for a piece in a newspaper, or informally by telling other people about the work of the Foundation and how it has helped you.  We recognise that not everyone wants to share their story and you would always be given the option, but it helps us if you are prepared to take part in this way.

 

IMPLATS BURSARY PLAN!

Implats Bursary for candidates with leadership potential 

Implats bursaries are open to all candidates meeting the minimum criteria of a university exemption pass and a minimum C symbol in mathematics and science. Our bursaries cover:

  • Registration and tuition fees for the duration of the course
  • Residence fees
  • Cash allowance
  • Personal computer allowance from second year of study

Should you be awarded an Implats bursary, you will be required to work for the company for the full period of the bursary and to undertake vacation work at the company at the end of each year.

Implats offers bursaries in various fields:

  • Engineering
    • Mining
    • Metallurgy
    • Chemical
    • Mechanical
    • Electrical (heavy current)
  • Chemistry to honours level
  • Geology to honours level
  • Accounting to honors level
  • Survey
  • Human Resources Bcom to honors level

 

Bursary application

Please print and complete the application form to be submitted with copies of the following documents:
IMPORTANT:
  • Your CV
  • ID document (certified)
  • Proof of latest results (certified)

Please post your application to:

THE TRAINING MANAGER – BURSARIES, PO BOX 5683, RUSTENBURG, 0300

What we are looking for

Implats is looking for people who

  • are able to work under pressure
  • have leadership potential, combined with the ability to work in a team
  • have good problem-solving abilities
  • are tenacious
  • have common sense
  • are able to make decisions and to think logically
  • are self-motivated, and
  • have good communication skills

How to apply for a bursary

If you meet the minimum criteria and you would like to apply for a bursary, please fill in the application form. For more information contact Kefiloe Seome on +27 14 569 0088

Source: www.implats.co.za/

Impala

Hans Merensky first discovered platinum in the Bushveld Igneous Complex in 1924. Impala was created in the mid 1960’s to house Union Corporation’s platinum interests. At that time a prospecting permit was acquired and initial production commenced in 1969. Initially Impala mined the Merensky Reef and mining on the UG2 chromitite layer only began in the early 1980’s as the technology to smelt higher chrome ore was developed. By the early 1990’s Impala was producing in the region of 1 million platinum ounces per annum. A mining lease over land predominantly owned by the Bafokeng Tribe (now the Royal Bafokeng Nation (RBN)) was originally granted in 1968. A landmark agreement securing Impala’s access to these mineral rights for a period of 40 years was signed with the RBN in February 1999. In terms of this agreement, the RBN not only enjoyed royalties from metals mined in areas over which they hold mineral rights, but they also became a major shareholder in the holding company, Implats, with board representation. A new agreement finalised in early March 2007 resulted in the royalty being converted into equity making the RBN the group’s largest shareholder.

 

Impala is Implats’ primary operational unit and has operations situated on the Impala lease area on the western limb of the world-renowned Bushveld Complex near Rustenburg, and in Springs, east of Johannesburg. In FY2014, a year impacted by a five-month strike, Impala produced 411000 ounces of refined platinum. A strategic review is currently being undertaken and is scheduled to be completed by the end of December 2014. The results will be communicated in February 2015.

SAMRO – CATHSSETA

SAMRO – South Africa Music Rights Organisation

CATHSSETA

The SAMRO Foundation is awarding two SAMRO/RIESA Special Undergraduate Bursaries for study in music performance for the first time.

Eighteen candidates from nine South African universities were entered for the bursaries. They included students in jazz piano, trombone, trumpet and voice, African music, marimbas, drums, voice and dance, traditional bagpipes, and Western art music piano, voice and clarinet.

The bursaries have the value of R18 000 each and are available annually to undergraduate students who specialise in music performance in the Traditional, Jazz or Western Art Music genres. Candidates for the bursaries are nominated by the Heads and relevant members of staff of music departments of South African institutions of higher education from among the ranks of their students. The candidates are required to show merit in the field of performance in one or more of these genres. The winners are chosen by the Artistic Committee of the SAMRO Foundation which takes into consideration such criteria as standard of performance, year of study and perceived financial need. In the event that there are no suitable candidates, the bursaries are carried over to the following year.

 

 

BACKGROUND

The Roodepoort International Eisteddfod of South Africa (RIESA) was a now-deregistered Section 21 not-for-profit organisation which, from 1981 to 1997, ran nine biennial international music competitions for amateur performers in Roodepoort.

In 2010, RIESA made a bequest of R700 000 to the SAMRO Endowment for the National Arts (SENA) – now the SAMRO Foundation – to establish and administer undergraduate bursaries for studies in music performance in South Africa. As with the many other bequests which the Foundation administers – including, among others, those from Ralph Trewhela, Eve Gettleson, Esme Webb, Maisie Flink, NOASA (the National Opera Association of South Africa) and Bonhams Auctioneers – the funds are invested and the interest is distributed as bursaries for music study in various fields.

For more information, contact Naseema Yusuf at the SAMRO Foundation on 011 712 8417, naseema.yusuf@samro.org.za

Bursaries awarded to women in property

The Women’s Property Network (WPN) was established in early 2000 to create a forum for women in a predominantly male industry to join together to exchange information, develop business contacts and enhance professional success.

WPN bursaries awarded to women in property

Since 2008 WPN has awarded bursaries to female students studying towards a property related degree or diploma.

This year has been no exception, and a total of 13 bursaries totalling in excess of R500 000 (tuition and learning material fees) have been awarded to the students studying at various institutions across the country.

All the applicants were deserving in terms of personal circumstances, had achieved in excess of 60 percent average and showed a passion for the property industry. The WPN did not have sufficient funds to award all of the bursaries, and embarked on a fund raising initiative in February to register the WPN as a charity entry into the Two Oceans Marathon, and friends of WPN ran to support the charity.

Companies within the property industry were also challenged by Amelia Beattie, one of the Educational Trust’s Trustees, to pledge support to WPN for the awarding of 2014 bursaries. The response was overwhelming and within 48 hours of the request having been made, over R200 000 had been pledged.

In addition to these pledges, Delta Property Fund also made a significant contribution of R500 000 to the Educational Trust, thereby ensuring that all thirteen bursaries could be awarded.

This is according to WPN Chair, Sanett Uys, who says they have been overwhelmed by the generous support of companies in the industry and the WPN members who have contributed in their personal capacities. “On behalf of the WPN Executive, I would like to thank contributors for their support. The WPN Educational Trust is a special initiative, and one which has been nurtured for many years so as to ensure that young female graduates take their place in the industry and are able to make a meaningful contribution.”

Source: www.property24.com

Diba Letsoalo says the investment in her education is an investment into her future and hopes its an investment into the property sector.

Of the bursaries awarded, here are responses from some of the students:

Andrica Lekganyane

“I would like to thank all the funders for affording me the opportunity to study a Property related course and for the confidence they have in developing future female property leaders. It is an honour to be the recipient of a WPN bursary. You educate a woman, you educate the nation. Thank you Women’s Property Network for the generosity extended to the future of this country.”

Aqeelah Johaar

“I’d like to thank each and every one who made this bursary possible. Words cannot describe what it means to me and how grateful I am to be given an opportunity to be part of the very few lucky ones who received this bursary. Not only does this mean that I can study in peace without worrying about funding but it also means that I have an incentive to work harder knowing that people went to a great deal of effort for me to be awarded this bursary.”

Bonette Kehuptse

“This means that I am now able to pay for my tuition for my Honours year and buy textbooks that I would have otherwise not been able to afford. This also means that I have a more peaceful semester and not have to worry about outstanding fees and not being allowed to graduate at the end of the year.”

Azra Mia

Tintswalo Chauke says this will encourage her to work harder so that she can also give back to the fellow women who are in the property industry.

“I would like to express my sincere gratitude to everyone involved in awarding this bursary to me. University is an expensive endeavour. However, with your generosity, the financial burden upon my family and I has decreased drastically and will allow for me to pursue my dreams without too much stress. Thank you for recognising the need for bursaries around my chosen degree as they are very scarce. Thanks to Women’s Property Network and all donors’ contributions to the Educational Trust. I hope to be able to pay this kind act forward in the future.”

Thandiwe Gumede

“Receiving a bursary from the Women’s Property Network has provided me with relief from financial strain and looming debt traps that are disguised in well packaged loan offers. The freedom that this bursary is offering me is immeasurable and its effects will be felt well after the completion of my post-graduate studies.

“In addition to this, I am grateful for the investment in me and my career, as well as the opportunity to be mentored by women who are successfully making a mark in the property industry. Education remains the most powerful tool we have to rebuild our country with and to ensure sustainable transformation. I am excited to be a part of the change and to play my part in the rebuilding process.”

In addition to the awarding of the bursaries, the WPN through its regional chapters and committees will support these students by ensuring regular contact to discuss study material and any problem areas that may have arisen and will engage with the students at the networking events so that they have access to women active in the industry.

IDC awards bursaries to students

IDC awards bursary to deserving students

 

Ecstatic 18 year old Mudanalo Mulaudzi believes she is heading for a bright and successful future. Her life took a turn for the better last month, when she heard she would receive a bursary from the Industrial Development Corporation.

“It’s a blessing for me and a dream come true. I have always wanted to study accounting science at the University of Witwatersrand,” says Mulaudzi, who wrote matric at Tshiitwa Secondary School in Limpopo.

Mulaudzi, who grew up in rural Limpopo, says getting the scholarship is a ticket out of poverty. She hopes to join the growing number of black female chartered accountants in the country. “I want to work hard in my studies and prove to everyone else that anything in life is possible.”

She was one of the 72 students who were awarded bursaries by the IDC as part of its corporate social investment programme. They were congratulated at a ceremony on 23 January at the IDC headquarters in Sandton. The bursaries will pay for their tuition, books, meals and accommodation during their studies.

Speaking at the ceremony, IDC divisional executive for agro and new industries Khumo Morolo encouraged the students to work hard in achieving their dreams and not to listen to naysayers. “You are important to us and the future of the country and without your success we are clearly doomed,” said Morolo.

Source: www.idc.co.za

A former bursary beneficiary, Awonke Tshefu, spoke of how the scholarship had helped him continue his studies in chemistry at Fort Hare University. Tshefu, who received a bursary in 2014, had almost dropped out of his studies because he could not afford the tuition fees for his second year.

He thanked the IDC for helping him and encouraged the new bursary recipients to work hard. “Life became much easier when I was awarded a scholarship by the IDC. I focused more on my books and no longer had to worry about where my next meal was going to come from.”

Chief executive officer Geoffrey Qhena encouraged the students to take advantage of the opportunity and to use education to become globally competitive. “You have not arrived yet; it is just the beginning. We will support you as long as you play your part,” he said.

During the ceremony, 12 top performers from universities around the country, who were also on IDC bursaries, received certificates and iPads for their hard work.

 

Ashley Bridget Wilton, who is in her second year at the University of Cape Town, received an IDC bursary in 2016 for her first year of studies. She is currently doing an engineering degree in geomatics. “It feels great to be acknowledged for my hard work.”

About 272 students are on the IDC bursary programme and R14-million will be spent on meeting their needs this year.

SANZAF – Bursary Succes Stories

SANZAF students make their mark.

SANZAF – Bursary Succes Stories

The South African National Zakah Fund (SANZAF) is a faith based organization that organizes a number of outreach activities and extends its services throughout the country. Besides assisting those in need, SANZAF strives to empower, develop and nurture the youth across the Peninsula through the SANZAF Education Empowerment and Development (SEED) programme. The programme focuses on Early Childhood Development, Youth and Community Development, Islamic Studies, Vocational Training and Higher Education. Based on a stringent criteria, SANZAF supports students in need of financial assistance for further studies, allowing them to venture off into a brighter future without the strain of financial difficulty and armed to face the world of work.

Students share some insightful thoughts on their experiences…

To contribute financially or in kind to a SANZAF project or programme, contact 0861 726 923

Succes Stories

 

Talha Bakharia

Successful Forensic Accounting major Talha Bakharia graduated from North-West University (NWU) in Potchefstroom- He describes the trials and tribulations of life as a student and elaborates the importance of having a vision.

“It took me 5 years to obtain my Honours Degree and I’ll never forget that moment when I failed my major- the pass rate was 50% and I needed 3%. My lecturer advised that I repeat the year,”

explains Bakharia who eventually graduated with an Honours Degree from North-West University (NWU) in Potchefstroom.

He adds that he appreciates his accomplishment more because, according to him, there was no “easy way out”.

Furthermore Bakharia first came to hear of SANZAF’s Education Empowerment Development (SEED) bursary programme by a family member who recommended him to apply for a SANZAF bursary.

“I know SANZAF aims to uplift and empower the Muslim youth so I applied for a bursary,”

says Bakharia, who believes that financial difficulty should never be an issue for students who are eager and willing to learn.

“People and organizations will assist you if you are determined to learn- so show it!”

Ishrath Kalib

Bcom Accounting graduate Ishrath Kalib is now doing her practical training as well as her Honours degree part time at the University of South Africa (UNISA).

“I would like to thank the South African National Zakah Fund (SANZAF) for the endless support towards my studies, both financially and morally. Without the help of SANZAF and their tireless effort, I would not have been able to obtain my degree. I believe in giving back in many ways and Inshallah, help students like myself in the future.”

Sameera Sayed

Sameera Sayed has completed her Bachelor of Social Science (B.Soc.Sc. or B.Soc.Sci.) degree and intends to do her Honours full time.

“I always intended to study further and do my best so I stand a better chance of employment. SANZAF has made that possible for me and I am truly grateful to SANZAF for the financial help and guidance.”

Rokeiya Letala

Rokeiya Letala is a student majoring in Taxation at the University of Pretoria. Growing up without a father in Witsrandjies, a village in the North West, with 4 siblings can be fairly daunting for many.

“I needed to be sure that the organization sponsoring my studies is not Riba based. My brother then informed me about SANZAF who supports those in need as well as academically deserving students. Through the will and grace of the almighty, SANZAF gave me the opportunity to complete my degree in an honest manner within the folds of Islam.”

She added that her reason to study Bcom Honors in Taxation stems from her eagerness to benefit and educate her community about tax.

“Taxation is a very exciting field of study- in particular; it is something high in demand in our country and is also one of the biggest source of income. It is fairly fascinating and interesting to know just how, why and where the government makes money through the laws of tax.

“Success isn’t only at a certain point in life- it is a continuous journey. Let the principles of Islam guide you in your decisions- don’t ever lose yourself, stay true to yourself, stick to your values and you will come out tops!”

CATHSSETA Bursary Programme

The CATHSSETA bursary should be used to pay (tuition), fees, textbooks, accommodation, meals and other course related costs.

Who, When and How to apply?

CATHSSETA bursaries are being offered as Discretionary Grant which can be applied for during Discretionary Grant Window Period in April and September annually. The discretionary grant shall be paid to legal persons including:

  • A public education and training institution
  • An employer or enterprise within the jurisdiction of a SETA, including an employer or enterprise not required to pay a skills development levy in terms of the Skills Development Levies Act.
  • Other legal person contemplated in the grant Regulation’s Section 6(7) that meets the criteria for the payment of such.
  • Relevant government Department paying admission fee to CATHSSETA and submitting WSP and ATR within the time frames prescribed in the Grant Regulation 4(2) and 4(3)

Employed and unemployed learners that have enrolled, or are in the process of enrolling as a full-time or part-time student at any South African Public University, University of Technology, or FET College are eligible for the grant. This Bursary is restricted to learners who have enrolled for qualifications related to the following CATHSSETA sectors which seek to address the Scarce and critical Skills identified in the CATHSSETA Sector Skills Plan:

  • Arts and Culture
  • Hospitality
  • Tourism
  • Conservation
  • Gaming and Lottery
  • Sports and Recreation

All completed application forms will be evaluated by the CATHSSETA and successful applicants, will be notified thereafter.

Enquiries can be directed to Ms Lebogang Mpye on (011) 217 0600 or email : lebohangm@cathsseta.org.za

Source: www.cathsseta.org.za

 

CATHSSETA Bursary Programme

The CATHSSETA  has identified as one of its strategic objectives the need to support learners who have either  received acceptance letter or have already started studying at any South African Public Institution by offering learners bursaries to further their studies. The programme is addressing Output 4.2.3.2 of the National Skills Development Strategy III. The CATHSSETA bursary grant can be used to pay study fees, textbooks, accommodation, meals and other related costs.

 

The CATHSSETA bursary is available to:

Learners that have enrolled, or are in the process of enrolling as a full-time or part-time student at a any South African Public University, University of Technology, or FET College. This Bursary is restricted to learners who have enroll in the qualifications related to the following CATHSSETA chambers which seek to address the Scarce and critical Skills identified in the CATHSSETA Sector Skills Plan:

  • Arts and Culture
  • Hospitality
  • Tourism
  • Conservation
  • Gamming and Lottery
  • Sports and Recreation

 

Who is eligible?

CATHSSETA offers assistance to those parents whose income is such that they would not otherwise be able to pay the full fees of their children’s education. The awards are also based on the learner’s performance. The bursary continues for every year in which the learner remains enrolled. However it is re-assessed by the CATHSSETA Bursary committee annually. The bursary application form can be found within the CATHSSETA Bursary Division upon request.

 

When and How to apply?:

 Cathsseta has an opening bursary application period towards the end of each year. Again partnerships are formed with Government Institutions to provide CATHSSETA with suitable learners enrolled on qualifications related to the sectors.  Learners are to complete application forms which will be evaluated by the Cathsseta Bursary Committee. If the learner is successful they will be offered a bursary

 

 

R5m in bursaries awarded in built environment

Bursaries awared

Forty matriculants from schools across South Africa have received bursaries totalling R5-million to further their studies in the fields of the built environment from the Department of Public Works (DPW), in partnership with the Construction Education and Training Authority (Ceta).

 

Speaking at the event in Centurion on Tuesday, Public Works Minister Thulas Nxesi noted that each of the students would receive a R120 000 bursary, which would cover their studies at a tertiary institution, accommodation, textbooks and a monthly allowance.

 

“Money spent on the education of our children is not simply another expenditure and, therefore, a drain of the fiscus, but rather it must be seen as an investment in the lives of our learners. It must be seen as an investment in the economy and . . . in the future wellbeing of the society as a whole,” he added.

 

Careers in the built environment include civil, electrical, mechanical and chemical engineering; quantity surveying; property valuation; architecture; landscape architecture and town planning.

Of the 40 bursary recipients, 31 were from schools participating in the Department of Public Works schools programme.  Fifteen schools in Mthatha, Pretoria, Port Elizabeth, Polokwane, Mmabatho and Kimberley took part in the programme.  “The schools programme seeks to address . . . challenges and to promote teaching of maths and science, while opening up access to the built environment professions,” Nxesi noted.

 

In an attempt to address built environment skills shortages, the DPW adopted the Council for the Built Environment’s Skills Pipeline strategy, which comprises three intervention areas aimed at ensuring a seamless flow of professionals into the department.

Source: www.engineeringnews.co.za

This included the Push strategy, aimed at providing enough competent and skilled professionals in the built environment through supported and funded secondary and tertiary education programmes.

Nxesi explained that each student signed a contract with the department, which would see them work in the department for the same number of years it took them to complete their studies. He believed that this added practical value to the students’ careers.

Meanwhile, he called on parents to support their children while at primary and high school. “We want to promote parental participation; parents mustn’t just dump their kids at school and think that teachers are going to [perform] miracles. Parents must be there to support, discuss, exchange information and help [their children] deal with their problems,” Nxesi stressed.

Also speaking at the event, Ceta CEO Sonja Pilusa pointed out that the training authority had greatly contributed to the bursary scheme through its R50-million discretionary grant, which was aimed at supporting the implementation of all capacity building programmes in the DPW, including internships, artisan development programmes and schools programme.

Further, she noted that Ceta had allocated R1.2-billion in skills development over the last two years. “We have made the biggest allocation towards skills development out of the 21 sector education and training authorities (Setas); however, we are not the biggest Seta in terms of revenue,” Pilusa pointed out.

She added that in relation to bursaries, Ceta allocated R110-million in the last financial year, noting that these bursaries were divided among “quite a few” entities, mostly public, with R9-million was allocated to Public Works.

 

TURNAROUND STRATEGY

Nxesi told reporters that the schools programme formed part of the Public Works’ turnaround strategy, which was focused on streamlining activities, rooting out corruption, promoting efficient labour relations and generally targeting the challenges the department faced.

Last year, media reports stated that the department incurred a loss of R34.9-billion through irregular expenditure. Nxesi attributed the department’s overspending to a lack of skills and noted that the students presented with bursaries by the department would eventually supply these much-needed skills.

When asked if those without skills in the department were retrenched, Nxesi told Engineering News that the department was looking to retrain its staff through programmes, while those that could not be retrained, would possibly be redeployed in other positions. Nxesi added that retrenchment was not an option, as the department was grossly understaffed.

 

The retraining programme involved awarding bursaries to a group of employees, while some officials were placed in a candidacy programme.

 

PREVIOUS BURSARIES

Part of the Ceta grant was used in 2014 to award bursaries to 50 grade 12 learners under the DPW’s schools programme. Eighty-three more bursaries were awarded to students in their second, third and final year of studies. Nxesi said with regard to the 50 bursary recipients, a 75% success rate was achieved, with three students achieving between five and seven distinctions for their first-year studies. Of the 83 tertiary bursaries, 89% passed the subsequent year. However, Nxesi noted that the failure of the other students required analysis to identify the cause.

“Ideally, we don’t want anyone to fail,” he said.